Beaujolais Bigots?

Maybe...

Every year as the wind turns cooler, the leaves lose their greenness, the stove warms the house with smells of slow cooker meals and automatically a few of us (bigots) turn to bottles that are the epitome of damn scrumptuous.

Beaujolais’s notable standing was at odds in the last bit of the 20th century as it was more memorable for the marketing success of Beaujolais nouveau than for true quality.  That success was brought upon by Georges Duboeuf who mass markets some inexpensive and super ripe Gamay to Americans the third Wednesday in November every year.

In the last dozen years or so, Beaujolais has come back with a vengeance.  Small producers, focused on quality, have begun laying the framework for a brighter future in Beaujolias.  While building the skeleton, these vignerons have also shown the world that their wines can be far more complex and age-worthy than most originally thought.  Even the Villages level wines today are quadruple the quality that were produced in the 80's. 

There are ten crus of Beajolais that need to be named in order to understand the true Beaujolais; wines with amazing purity and unparalleled value.  These wines are for enjoyment, not to be overanalyzed and they are to be enjoyed with friends, family and a home cooked meal.

Brouilly - Generally lighter and meant for consumption within 3-4 years after release

Régnié - Generally lighter and meant for consumption within 3-4 years after release

Chiroubles - Generally lighter and meant for consumption within 3-4 years after release

Côte de Brouilly - Generally medium in body and some bottle aging of at least a year will benefit

Fleurie - Generally medium in body and some bottle aging of at least a year will benefit

Saint-Amour - Generally medium in body and some bottle aging of at least a year will benefit

Chénas - Typically the fullest bodies of all the crus and meant for aging up to 10 years

Juliénas - Typically the fullest bodies of all the crus and meant for aging up to 10 years

Morgon - Typically the fullest bodies of all the crus and meant for aging up to 10 years

Moulin-à-Vent - Typically the fullest bodies of all the crus and meant for aging up to 10 years

Take a serious look this year at what you are drinking, drive past the Gamay spigot and be a Beaujolais bigot.

 

Try these favorites from Sour Grapes

Jean-Claude Chanudet (Domaine Chamonard) Beaujolais Villages Cuvée du Chat 2011 

Chateau Cambon 2010

Domaine de Foretal Beaujolais Villages 2011